The End Is Nigh Prose Contest

THE END IS NIGH: A Researched Prose Contest from the Carolina Quarterly.

STEP 1: Excavate bunker in backyard. Prep doomsday go-bag. Sharpen quills.endisnighcrop
STEP 2: Survive apocalypse, literal, metaphorical, figurative or otherwise. Take copious notes.
STEP 3: Write it up. Send it in.
STEP 4: Win cash money, big-time celebrity writer validation, publication in the Carolina Quarterly and titillating sexual favors from adoring fans.*

Send us your dispatches about anxious endings, anticipated apocalypses, doomsday prepping, or getting right with God and family before it all comes crashing down. Or tell us about the aftermath of a less-than-total cataclysm. How do you move on after you literally (or figuratively) bet it all on END.

Pieces should incorporate travel experience, archival research, ethnographic observation, interviews, technical vocabulary from specialized professions, schematics for future technologies, or otherwise explore the vast, undocumented wilderness that lies beyond contemporary fiction and nonfiction’s manicured, clearly demarcated backyards.

Contest ends at midnight EST, December 31, 2013. No more than 5000 words per submission. Author name and contact information should appear on the cover letter, but nowhere else on the submission.

The grand prize winner will receive $1000. Three runners-up will receive $150 each. All winners will be published in an upcoming issue and featured in our online edition.

 

Guidelines:
Contest entry fee is $15, or $25 with a one-year subscription to the Quarterly (Just a buck more than the regular price!).

To submit, go here: https://www.tellitslant.com/home/journal_details/21

Or mail your entry, fee, and a SASE to THE END IS NIGH, Carolina Quarterly, 510 Greenlaw Hall, CB# 3520, UNC-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599.

 

Contest Judge: Jim Shepard
Jim_Shepard_bodyJim Shepard is the author of six novels, including most recently Project X, and four story collections, including most recently You Think That’s Bad (Knopf, March 2011). His third collection, Like You’d Understand, Anyway, was a finalist for the National Book Award and won The Story Prize. Project X won the 2005 Library of Congress/Massachusetts Book Award for Fiction, as well as the ALEX Award from the American Library Association. His short fiction has appeared in, among other magazines, Harper’s, McSweeney’s, Paris Review, Atlantic Monthly, Esquire, DoubleTake, the New Yorker, Granta, Zoetrope: All-Story, and Playboy, and he was a columnist on film for the magazine The Believer. Four of his stories have been chosen for the Best American Short Stories, and one for a Pushcart Prize. He teaches at Williams College and in the Warren Wilson MFA program, and lives in Williamstown with his wife Karen Shepard, his three children, and two beagles.

 

*no promises on that last bit.