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RECENT ISSUES

 

WINTER 2022
Volume 71.2

FALL 2021
Volume 71.1

SPRING/SUMMER 2021
Volume 70.3

WINTER 2021
Volume 70.2

 

FEATURES

REVIEWS

Indigo: A Review

ELLIE RAMBO

“Powell is at his nonfiction best when writing about places, and not for the reasons many travel writers are praised. It’s not so much his ability to evoke a place in vivid detail that is notable, although he demonstrates this ability in ‘New Orleans.’ Instead, it’s the way the places he writes about seem haunted by other places, lost opportunities, and alternative choices the author might make.”

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FICTION

The Other Woman

ERIN BLUE BURKE

“But she knows it is impossible to escape completely, for everyone who sees her plays a hypothetical interrogation in their heads, speculates about her feelings, her mental well-being, why it is exactly that she is spending so many hours swimming.”

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FICTION

RealityCheck

JAKE SLOVIS

“I didn’t protest, which I think bothered her—the point of all this was to argue and see if that brought about anything new. But sitting beside her it just seemed insincere to pick a petty fight face-to-face. So I reached for the laptop and started our virtual lives together.”

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REVIEWS

Syncopated Sensibility: Review of Sevastopol

CELIA LEGBAND HAWLEY

“Emphasis is created by avoiding the obvious, by downplaying the dramatic, and by calling out the mundane and the everyday with apt and telling description. The asymmetrical balance Fraia thus achieves is a cornerstone of the storytelling in this slight but mighty novel.”

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REVIEWS

Bewilderness: A Review

BEE GRAY-ARMY

“Tucker pulls from a deep well of emotions which readers of all types might relate to. The messaging is consistent throughout the novel: being an addict does not mean you are less worthy; all human life deserves to be valued. This message is a step in a healing direction—and one that I believe might inspire thoughtful discussions about addiction between readers of the book.”

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FICTION

Proofs of Purchase

GEORGE SINGLETON

“I looked out the door and saw men in wheelchairs, fingers raised as pretend guns in the direction of an aide’s mishap, and thought how I wanted to get out a map and find a safer place to live, an Eden where no one lost memory, and where box tops counted.”

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REVIEWS

The Naomi Letters: A Review

MARY SIMS

The Naomi Letters tracks the speaker’s journey into self-discovery—depicting a final healing between body and mind. Reading these poems—experiencing Mennies’ vivid images of devotion and brilliantly composed self-realizations—is an exercise in voyeurism, an intimate glimpse into the privacy of the speaker’s mind. We, like Naomi, are asked called to witness: ‘Instead of forgive me, Naomi, I will try to ask you to listen.'”

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FICTION

An Assembly

CHELSIE BRYANT

“’When you’re dead, it’s not about you,’ Grandma Owens said. She smoothed out her coat, blew fog into the air. The fading light triangulated the shadow on her nose. ‘It’s about anyone that cared, anyone bothered to remember.’ She patted her chest. ‘If you’re lucky, that’s someone.’” 

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