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RECENT ISSUES

 

SPRING/SUMMER 2021
Volume 70.3

WINTER 2021
Volume 70.2

FALL 2020
Volume 70.1

SUMMER 2020
Volume 69.4

 

FEATURES

REVIEWS

Flourish: A Review

DEBORAH BACHARACH

“For Malech, language is a place of accidents and magic. She is curious what happens to the reader under the powerful spell of sounds and syllables. In “Caldo” she waves her wand and “mela miele mille” an apple can turn into honey before our eyes.

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FICTION

Wanted to Pin to the Wall

MARY BYRNE

“Alicia ran her free hand along the back of her jeans, felt for the switchblade she kept pressed against her backside.

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FICTION

The Watchmaker

DANIEL KENNEDY

“He liked how the gaps in his consciousness were tucked safely in the watch’s sound. He would not someday wake to find that the sound had vanished. The watch had been built to last—to defy time, the very thing that justified its existence.

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REVIEWS

Rue: A Review

JULIA EDWARDS

“Instead of using pretty language to elevate or hide pain, Nuernberger leans into the indignities of being in a body, highlighting the unique precarity of women as bearers of life. This approach serves as a reminder of beauty’s proximity to ugliness and the deeper threats lurking below the surface of the procedural or mundane.

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REVIEWS

Funeral Diva: A Review

DEBORAH BACHARACH

“She demands the reader pay attention to the present as much as the past.

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REVIEWS

“The way I read any beloved -“: A Review of Postcolonial Love Poem 

JESSICA CORY 

“After all, seeking to improve through critical examination is an act of love.” 

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FICTION

Fencing

MARISA CLOGHER

“My husband touches my belly in the mornings, and I pity him. He stretches his hand as wide as it goes and places it on my stomach, as if to say, This is a sacred thing; I will help you make miracles with it. He pretends that it is still there, that it still works. Every morning I move his hand away from my stomach and shower until I forget his name.

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FICTION

Hurled Things

KARA MOSKOWITZ

“Tanya cannot recall her father’s face; for the life of her, she cannot pull him into focus from the deep backwoods of her memory. And so she finds herself looking at Evie, teasing out contours and tones, crinkles and expressions, trying to reverse-engineer his image from the clues her sister might hold.

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